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Oracle OpenWorld 2009: Pragmatism got Appreciated

by Douwe Pieter van den Bos on October 15, 2009 · 1 comment

On Wednesday October 14th I gave a short power session at Oracle OpenWorld 2009 about the power of pragmatism and creativity in Software development. The audience was great and a nice discussion got started fairly quick after we started. Because software development project can get very large and complex we, as a group, actually decided that there was no place for a single approach in the business. This is, because budgets and complexity varies, probably what pragmatism is really about.

When we take a look at the Oracle OpenWorld schedule there aren’t that many sessions about project management or software development in general, which in itself is pretty strange. Most of the sessions that are given (1800+) are about Oracle Products and how to use / implement them, but mine seems to be about the only one that really is just about the process of developing and designing software, we didn’t even talk about the different Oracle products (although we kinda agreed that Oracle Application Express is cool in pragmatic projects). Hopefully my presentation will change this, and there will be more of this next year.

My presentation itself can be seen here.


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One comment on “Oracle OpenWorld 2009: Pragmatism got Appreciated

  1. Pingback: Tweets die vermelden Oracle OpenWorld 2009: Pragmatism got Appreciated -- Topsy.com

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